Allo' Expat Vietnam - Connecting Expats in Vietnam
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Vietnam Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter

   Information Center Vietnam
Vietnam General Information
 
History of Vietnam
Vietnam Culture
Vietnam Cuisine
Vietnam Geography
Vietnam Population
Vietnam Government
Vietnam Economy
Vietnam Communications
Vietnam Transportations
Vietnam Military
Vietnam Transnational Issues
Vietnam People, Languages & Religions
Vietnam Education
Vietnam Environment Issues
Vietnam Flora & Fauna
Vietnam Healthcare
Vietnam Expatriates Handbook
Vietnam and Foreign Government
Vietnam General Listings
Vietnam Useful Tips
Vietnam Education & Medical
Vietnam Travel & Tourism Info
Vietnam Lifestyle & Leisure
Vietnam Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

Vietnam Healthcare
 
 
 

The overall quality of health in Vietnam is good, as reflected by 2010 estimates of life expectancy (76.86 years) and infant mortality (20.24 per 1,000 live births).

However, malnutrition is still common in the provinces, and the life expectancy and infant mortality rates are stagnating. In 2001, government spending on healthcare corresponded to just 0.9% of gross domestic product (GDP). Government subsidies covered only about 20% of healthcare expenses, with the remaining 80% coming out of individuals’ own pockets.

In 1954, North Vietnam established a public health system that reached down to the hamlet level. After the national reunification in 1975, this system was extended to the provinces of former South Vietnam. In the late 1980s, the quality of healthcare declined to some degree as a result of budgetary constraints, a shift of responsibility to the provinces, and the introduction of charges. Inadequate funding has also contributed to a shortage of nurses, midwives and hospital beds. According to the World Bank in 2000, Vietnam had only 250,000 hospital beds, or 14.8 beds per 10,000 people.

Since the early 2000s, Vietnam has made significant progress in combating malaria, with the malaria mortality rate falling to about 5% of its 1990s equivalent by 2005, after the country introduced improved antimalarial drugs and treatment. However, tuberculosis cases are on the rise, with 57 deaths per day reported in May 2004. With an intensified vaccination program, better hygiene, and foreign assistance, Vietnam hopes to reduce sharply the number of TB cases and annual new TB infections.

As of September 2005, Vietnam had diagnosed 101,291 HIV cases, of which 16,528 progressed to AIDS, and 9,554 died. However, the actual number of HIV-positive individuals is estimated to be much higher. On average, 40-50 new infections are reported every day in Vietnam. As of 2007, 0.5% of the population is estimated to be infected with HIV, and this figure has remained stable since 2005. In June 2004, the United States announced that Vietnam would be one of 15 nations to receive funding as part of a $15 billion global AIDS relief plan.

 

 
 

 



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2018 | Policy